MICHAEL ORGERA • APSAN LAW

IMMIGRATION LAW EXPERTISE

Recognized as a preeminent immigration law firm with offices in Newark, New Jersey; New York, NY; and Coral Springs, FL

Family Sponsorship

U.S. Citizens are eligible to sponsor their Spouse, Parents, Siblings, and Children. Green Card Holders are eligible to sponsor their Spouse and Unmarried Children.

Once granted refugee status or asylum in the United States, you may qualify to bring certain family members to join you in the United States.

Adjustment of Status

Immigrants already in the United States may be able to apply for their Green Card without needing to go back to their home country for visa processing.  They may also be able to apply for a Work Permit and Travel Authorization while their Green Card is Processing.

Those granted refugee status or asylum in the United States are eligible to apply for a Green Card after one year.

Consular Processing

Immigrants outside of the United States need to apply for their Immigrant Visa (Green Card) at the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate in their home country.

This requires submitting multiple forms and attending an interview.

MICHAEL ORGERA • APSAN LAW

IMMIGRATION LAW EXPERTISE

Contact Senior Immigration Law Clerk Mike Orgera to discuss your immigration law matters

Naturalization (Citizenship) Applications

Green Card holders may be eligible to apply for U.S. Citizenship after having a Green Card for five years.

If a Green Card holder received their status by marrying a U.S. Citizen, they might be eligible to apply for U.S. Citizenship after three years. 

Employment Authorization Document (Work Permit) & Green Card Renewals

Non-Citizens with Work Permits and Green Card must keep their status valid and must renew their documents to maintain and prove their status in the United States.

Renewal applications, in some cases, can be submitted six months before your card expires.

U-Visas, T-Visas & VAWA Self-Petitioners

Victims of certain crimes -- that have suffered from substantial physical or mental abuse -- may be eligible for non-immigrant status (and eventually a Green Card) if they are willing to cooperate with law enforcement. This is also the case for victims of Human Trafficking.

Similarly, Victims in certain abusive relationships with a U.S Citizen (or Green Card holder) spouse or relative may be eligible for non-immigrant status (and eventually a green card) without needing to involve law enforcement.